CLIMATE CHANGE ADOPTION STRATEGIES BY ARABLE CROP FARMERS IN ETHIOPE EAST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF DELTA STATE, NIGERIA: A MULTIVARIATE PROBIT APPROACH

Ikpoza Eguono Aramide, N.C. Nwachukwu, O.A. Ohwo

Abstract


Background: The seasonality of most agricultural activities and restricted utilization of inputs in Africa, make it particularly helpless against weather or climate related difficulties across the different phases of the production cycle. Objective: This study focused on climate change adoption strategies by arable crop farmers in Ethiope East Local Government Area of Delta State, Nigeria.  Methodology: A total of one hundred and twenty (120) respondents were used for the study. Data analysis was achieved using descriptive statistics and multivariate probit (MVP) model. Results: The study revealed that the average age of the arable crop farmers was 40 years. An average income of ₦28,000 per month was earned by the arable crop farmers. The result on the various climate change adaptation strategies reveals that income diversification (85.0%) was the most utilized adaptation strategy. The result from the multivariate probit regression analysis revealed that age, farm income and extension visits have a significant impact on choice of climate change adaptation method. Implication: Households with diversified streams of income have greater chances of adopting climate change adaptation strategies because of their ability to afford them. Conclusion: An increase in age, farm income and extension visits have a significant impact on choice of climate change adaptation methods in the study area. It is therefore recommended that farmers in the study area need to expand their source of income in order to form backup savings to invest on adaptation infrastructure.

Keywords


adoption; strategies; climate change; crop farmers; multivariate probit; income diversification

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URN: http://www.revista.ccba.uady.mx/urn:ISSN:1870-0462-tsaes.v25i2.41022



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