GROWTH AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF MORINGA (Moringa stenopetala) ALONG AN ALTITUDINAL GRADIENT IN SOUTHERN ETHIOPIA

Rajesh Chauhan, Tesfaye Hailemariam, Yonas Ugo, Simon Shibru, Agena Anjulo, Asfaw Debella, Azmera Walche, Daba Misgana

Abstract


Background. Altitude affects growth and distribution of plants and influences the impacts of other environmental factors on plant growth and development. Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of altitude on the growth performance and carbon sequestration potential of Moringa stenopetala in the Konso Zone, Southern Ethiopia. Methodology. The three sites that were selected for the study include Bayde (1300-1500 masl), Gamole (1501-1700 masl) and Fasha (1701-1900 masl). From each site three age classes (6-10 years, 11-15 years and 16-20 years) were selected for the study. Six farmers were selected from each location and three trees from each farmer’s land under each age class were selected for measuring height and diameter. Non-destructive method was used for estimation of biomass and carbon contents of different age groups. Results. The results indicate that growth performance (height, diameter, volume, biomass production) and carbon sequestration of M. stenopetala was significantly higher (p < 0.05) at lower altitude as compared to mid and high altitude. It was concluded that M. stenopetala tree within 6-10 age class can sequester 10.96 kg of carbon stock by capturing 40.17 kg of carbon dioxide, while for age class of 11-15 the value of carbon storage and carbon dioxidesequestered is27.87 kg and 102.20 kg respectively. Similarly maximum sequestration of carbon dioxide was recorded (42.31 Kg and 155.11 Kg respectively) for 16-20 age class. .The annual sequestration of carbon was found maximum for class 16-20 (8.62 kg) followed by 11-15 class (7.86 kg) and lowest for 6-10 class (5.02 kg). Implications. The findings of present study will be helpful in knowing the effect of age and altitudinal variation on carbon sequestration potential of M. stenopetala. Conclusions. It is concluded that carbon sequestration potential of Moringa decreases with altitude and increases with stand age.

Keywords


Altitude; age classes; biomass; Moringa; tree diameter; tree height.

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URN: http://www.revista.ccba.uady.mx/urn:ISSN:1870-0462-tsaes.v24i3.35765



Copyright (c) 2021 Rajesh Chauhan, Tesfaye Hailemariam, Yonas Ugo, Simon Shibru, Agena Anjulo, Asfaw Debella, Azmera Walche, Daba Misgana

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