TROPICAL TREES AND SHRUBS WITH POTENTIAL TO REDUCE THE PRODUCTION OF METHANE IN RUMINANTS

Adrian Adolfo Sandoval Pelcastre, Mónica Ramirez Mella, Norma Laura Rodríguez Ávila, Bernardino Candelaria Martinez

Abstract


Background. Worlwide ruminants are an important source of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) as they contribute with around 115 million tons of methane on a yearly basis. Methane is generated by the fermentation of the feed inside the rumen by a microbial consortia constituted by bacteria, archaea, fungi and protozoa. Due to the warming power of methane, which is 28 higher than carbon monoxide, current research focuses on diminishing the emissions of this gas by domestic ruminants. The use of several species of tropical trees and shrubs as a supplement of ruminant feed have resulted ideal within silvopastoral systems. Objective. To analyze the current research on trees tropical foliage through the implementation of silvopastoral systems in conventional livestock systems with the aim to diminish GHG generated by ruminal fermentation. Methodology. The search of bibliographic information was performed during august 2018 and june 2019 using key terms. Results. The results from the diverse research shows that foliage from trees and shrubs located in tropical regions not only increase livestock performance, but al so diminish methane synthesis within the rumen due to the action of derived plant secondary metabolites such as condensed tannins, phenolic compounds, essential oils, flavonoids and saponins present in leaves and pods. Implications. The information presented in this paper focuses on the use of foliage of tree and shrub species with forage potential in tropical conditions, which have a significant effect on the reduction of methanogenesis in ruminants due to an improvement in nutritional quality of the diet and the presence of secondary metabolites Conclusion.  The use of silvopastoral systems with tropical legumes species have the potential of reducing the GHG produced by cattle by 20 up to 38 %.

Keywords


Secondary metabolites; global warming; enteric methane; ruminal microbiota.

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URN: http://www.revista.ccba.uady.mx/urn:ISSN:1870-0462-tsaes.v23i2.3061



Copyright (c) 2020 Bernardino Candelaria Martinez, Adrian Adolfo Sandoval Pelcastre, Norma Laura Rodríguez Ávila, Mónica Ramirez Mella

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