HUNTING AND USE OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN MAYAN COMMUNITIES

Oscar Gustavo Retana Guiascón, S.E. Padilla-Paz

Abstract


The objective of present study was to determine the current importance of hunting and use of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), as part of livelihood strategies in four Mayan communities: Nunkiní, Sahcabchén, Pich and Chencoh, all located in Campeche state, México. From March 2013 to September 2015, 215 structured interviews were conducted, recording three hunting modalities: opportunist, way o spy (espiadero) and drive hunting (batida); from which they hunt 33 wildlife species in Nunkiní village, 28 in Sahcabchén; 42 in Pich and 31 in Chencoh. According to analyzed data from Use Value Index (IVUs), O. virginianus had the highest importance in the four communities studied (IVUs=0.4-0.6) with seven products for eight purposes. Food, medicine, adornment and commerce are the most significant use categories for this species. The White-tailed deer hunting that is currently practiced by Mayan communities is part of their strategies of multiple use of animal resources; hence the diversified utilization of this deer is a diagnostic measure of the importance it has in the subsistence of indigenous communities in Campeche.

Keywords


Campeche; Cervidae; Hunting; Subsistence; Use-value.

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URN: http://www.revista.ccba.uady.mx/urn:ISSN:1870-0462-tsaes.v21i2.2442



Copyright (c) 2018 Oscar Gustavo Retana Guiascón

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