FLORISTIC COMPOSITION AND ARRANGEMENT OF AGROFORESTRY SYSTEMS OF COCOA IN TABASCO, MEXICO

Vanessa Lisbeth Morán-Villa, Alejandro Ismael Monterroso-Rivas, Jesús David Gómez-Díaz, Sergio Roberto Márquez-Berber, Eduardo Valdés-Velarde

Abstract


Background. The floristic composition of the cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) agroforestry systems in Tabasco provides a way to describe the genetic and tree diversity of traditional forms of production. Objective. to evaluate how the cacao agroforestry systems are floristically composed in the state. Methodology. Thirteen plots were sampled in four municipalities, with a total area of 30.5 ha. The species were counted, and the importance, diameter classes, height, and main uses were estimated. Results. Seventeen families and 2370 individuals belonging to 36 species were recorded. The dominant families were Fabaceae and Rutaceae; The species with the highest presence (74.5%) were represented by Cedrela odorata L, Erythrina americana Mill., Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) Walp., Tabebuia rosea (Bertol) DC., Swietenia macrophylla Willd., Cocos nucifera L, Colubrina arborescens (P. Mill) Sarg., Pimenta dioica L., Cecropia obtusifolia Bertol and Roystonea dunlapiana P. H. Allen. In addition to providing shade, trees are used to obtain wood, fruit, fencing, or similar medicinal alternatives. On average, each plot has 46 trees per ha, a diversity of 9 different shade trees in young plantations, and 18 species in mature plantations, demonstrating the variety and floristic richness in the agroecosystem. Implications. It lays the foundations for future work that quantifies and enhances the environmental services provided by agroecosystems, as its utility on cacao agroforestry systems to preserve wildlife species. Conclusion. More studies should be implemented to deepen the knowledge of cocoa agroforestry systems (CAFS), particularly in quantifying and providing environmental services. Maintaining these CAFS will promote biodiversity and other environmental benefits, such as carbon storage, which with integrative plans, can represent alternative sources of income for producers in a sustainable way."Background. The floristic composition of the cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) agroforestry systems in Tabasco provides a way to describe the genetic and tree diversity of traditional forms of production. Objective. to evaluate how the cacao agroforestry systems are floristically composed in the state. Methodology. Thirteen plots were sampled in four municipalities, with a total area of 30.5 ha. The species were counted, and the importance, diameter classes, height, and main uses were estimated. Results. Seventeen families and 2370 individuals belonging to 36 species were recorded. The dominant families were Fabaceae and Rutaceae; The species with the highest presence (74.5%) were represented by Cedrela odorata L, Erythrina americana Mill., Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) Walp., Tabebuia rosea (Bertol) DC., Swietenia macrophylla Willd., Cocos nucifera L, Colubrina arborescens (P. Mill) Sarg., Pimenta dioica L., Cecropia obtusifolia Bertol and Roystonea dunlapiana P. H. Allen. In addition to providing shade, trees are used to obtain wood, fruit, fencing, or similar medicinal alternatives. On average, each plot has 46 trees per ha, a diversity of 9 different shade trees in young plantations, and 18 species in mature plantations, demonstrating the variety and floristic richness in the agroecosystem. Implications. It lays the foundations for future work that quantifies and enhances the environmental services provided by agroecosystems, as its utility on cacao agroforestry systems to preserve wildlife species. Conclusion. More studies should be implemented to deepen the knowledge of cocoa agroforestry systems (CAFS), particularly in quantifying and providing environmental services. Maintaining these CAFS will promote biodiversity and other environmental benefits, such as carbon storage, which with integrative plans, can represent alternative sources of income for producers in a sustainable way."

Keywords


Tree diversity, Importance value, Dominance, Richness, Theobroma cacao L.

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URN: http://www.revista.ccba.uady.mx/urn:ISSN:1870-0462-tsaes.v25i2.38401



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